Anarcho-syndicalism is a program of political organization founded on the principles of workers' self-management, direct democracy, and mutual aid. As anarchists, anarcho-syndicalists pursue the abolition of all systems of domination and exploitation - be they economic as with capitalism; political as with the state, bureaucracies, and prisons; or social as with misogyny, racism, and social oppressions; and as syndicalists, anarcho-syndicalists seek to create a society managed collectively and democratically by everyone who inhabits it. Anarcho-syndicalists believe there should be no separation between those who inhabit society and those who govern society - we assert that all those who inhabit society should govern society, cooperatively.


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Jul 19, 2014
@ 12:29 pm
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We have always lived in slums and holes in the wall. We will know how to accommodate ourselves for a while. For you must not forget that we can also build. It is we who built these palaces and cities, here in Spain and America and everywhere. We, the workers. We can build others to take their place. And better ones. We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth; there is not the slightest doubt about that. The bourgeoisie might blast and ruin its own world before it leaves the stage of history. We carry a new world here, in our hearts. That world is growing in this minute.

— Buenaventura Durruti


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Jun 27, 2014
@ 9:27 pm
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Minutes of the IWW Founding Convention | Industrial Workers of the World »

iwwchicagogmb:

On this day in Chicago, Illinois in 1905, the Founding Convention of the Industrial Workers of the World began. Numerous labor heavyweights attended, including William “Big Bill” Haywood, Mary Harris “Mother” Jones, Lucy Eldine Gonzalez Parsons, Eugene Victor Debs, Daniel De Leon, and hundreds of rank and file members of what would become known as “The Wobblies.”

[x378436]


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Jun 13, 2014
@ 3:07 pm
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iwwchicagogmb:

Hello, and welcome to the official IWW Chicago GMB Tumblr page!
The Social Media Committee is excited to announce that this page is live as of today, Friday the 13th, 2014.
We hope you’ll check our page regularly for exciting news regarding the Chicago IWW, actions, and events, as well as union-wide news, updates about specific campaigns, and workplace organizing tips.
If you are unfamiliar with the IWW, please check our “About the IWW” section to learn more.
Feel free to ask us any questions you may have  we look forward to chatting with you in the future!
(And a special Friday the 13th welcome from Sabo-Tabby - you can learn all about our loveable black cat mascot right here: http://www.iww.org/history/icons/black_cat) 

iwwchicagogmb:

Hello, and welcome to the official IWW Chicago GMB Tumblr page!

The Social Media Committee is excited to announce that this page is live as of today, Friday the 13th, 2014.

We hope you’ll check our page regularly for exciting news regarding the Chicago IWW, actions, and events, as well as union-wide news, updates about specific campaigns, and workplace organizing tips.

If you are unfamiliar with the IWW, please check our “About the IWW” section to learn more.

Feel free to ask us any questions you may have  we look forward to chatting with you in the future!

(And a special Friday the 13th welcome from Sabo-Tabby - you can learn all about our loveable black cat mascot right here: http://www.iww.org/history/icons/black_cat

(via wobblydash)


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May 24, 2014
@ 12:12 pm
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anarchofoxxy:

This, dear friends, is capitalism in a nutshell.

anarchofoxxy:

This, dear friends, is capitalism in a nutshell.

(via tardissr)


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May 23, 2014
@ 5:28 pm
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Help Black Rose Press Open Up Shop »

wobblydash:

Summary

Black Rose Press is opening a screen printing shop/storefront in South Minneapolis. Please help us make this project a success.

We are a worker-owned, cooperative print shop, as well as an IWW union shop. The building was purchased this winter, and since then we have been working with the city, architects, and contractors to get ready for a big summer of renovations.

The building will serve as our printing studio, with multiple presses and various pre-press processes. The front room will also have space for retail. The building also has a seperate unit that will be rented out to generate income for the cooperative.

Our hope is to see this sturdy, yet neglected building become a permanent space for a cooperative business, specifically our small union print shop.

blackrosepress.org

What We Need

We are looking for a little extra help to finish the renovations. Any support you can give us goes a long way.

Please help this IWW print shop get its feet off the ground and help them get started!


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May 22, 2014
@ 7:32 pm
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Anonymous said: So I'm taking intro to sociology, intro to human sexuality, and american government next semester. Any suggestions on anarchist and or marxist authors who can give me insight into these topics? Thanks

Sociology: In 1880 Marx wrote a piece called “A Workers Inquiry” which has been used as a model for radical sociology.  There’s a reader about it here.  The work of the Frankfurt School & critical theory would likely also be of interest.

Human sexuality: Foucault’s History of Sexuality, volume one.


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May 22, 2014
@ 12:51 am
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Syndicalists in the Russian Revolution (Grigori Petrovitch Maximov) | The Anarchist Library »

wobblydash:

“Discussing the activities and role of the Anarchists in the Revolution, Kropotkin said: ‘We Anarchists have talked much of revolutions, but few of us have been prepared for the actual work ,to be done during, the process. I have indicated some things in this relation in my Conquest of Bread. Pouget and Pataud have also sketched a line of action in their work on Syndicalism and the Co-operative Commonwealth.

Kropotkin thought that the Anarchists had not given sufficient to the fundamental elements of the social revolution. The real facts in a revolutionary process do not consist so much in actual fighting — that is, merely the destructive phase necessary to clear the way for constructive effort. The basic factor in a revolution is the organisation of the economic life of the country. The Russian Revolution had proved conclusively that we must prepare thoroughly for that. Everything else is of minor importance. He had come to think that, Syndicalism was likely to furnish what Russia most lacked: the channel through which the industrial and economic reconctruction of the country may flow. He referred to Anarcho-Syndicalism. That and the co-operatives would save other countries some of the blunders and suffering Russia was going though.”

-Emma Goldman, ‘My Disillusionment in Russia’, on a visit to Peter Kropotkin at Dimitrov, July 1920.

Currently reading this right now, it’s sooooo good.


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May 21, 2014
@ 11:57 pm
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Anarchist-Communism (Alain Pengam) | The Anarchist Library »

wobblydash:

Anarchist-communism has been regarded by other anarchist currents as a poor and despised relation, an ideological trophy to be exhibited according to the needs of hagiography or polemic before moving on to “serious things” (the collectivisations of Spain, anarcho-syndicalism, federalism or self-management), and as an “infantile utopia” more concerned with dogmatic abstractions than with “economic realities”. Yet, anarchist communism has been the only current within the anarchist movement that has explicitly aimed not only at ending exchange value but, among its most coherent partisans, at making this the immediate content of the revolutionary process. We are speaking here, of course, only of the current that explicitly described itself as “anarchist-communist”, whereas in fact the tendency in the nineteenth century to draw up a stateless communism “utopia” extended beyond anarchism properly so-called.

Anarchist-communism must be distinguished from collectivism, which was both a diffuse movement (see, for example, the different components of the International Working Men’s Association, the Guesdists, and so on) and a specific anarchist current. As far as the latter was concerned, it was Proudhon who supplied its theoretical features: an open opponent of communism (which, for him, was Etienne Cabet’s “communism”), he favoured instead a society in which exchange value would flourish — a society in which workers would be directly and mutually linked to each other by money and the market. The Proudhonist collectivists of the 1860’s and 1870’s (of whom Bakunin was one), who were resolute partisans of the collective ownership of the instruments of work and, unlike Proudhon, of land, maintained an essence of this commercial structure in the form of groups of producers, organised either on a territorial basis (communes) or on an enterprise basis (co-operatives, craft groupings) and linked to each other by the circulation of value. Collectivism was thus defined — and still is — as an exchange economy where the legal ownership of the instruments of production is held by a network of “collectivities” which are sorts of workers’ jointstock companies. Most contemporary anarchists (standing, as they do, for a self-managed exchange economy) are collectivists in this nineteenth-century sense of the term, even though the term has now come to have a somewhat different meaning (state ownership, i.e. “state capitalism”, rather than ownership by any collectivity).

In the 1870’s and the 1880’s the anarchist-communists, who wanted to abolish exchange value in all it’s forms, broke with the collectivists, and in so doing revived the tradition of radical communism that had existed in France in the 1840’s.


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May 16, 2014
@ 1:51 pm
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We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth; there is not the slightest doubt about that.

Buenaventura Durruti


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May 11, 2014
@ 12:25 am
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wobblydash:

May Day 2014 - Scenes From the Class War
(A)///(E) Fuck the police